How to Succeed in Periodontal Therapy Part Six

This Post discusses: Getting our minds right about scripts and rehearsals How adults learn Presentation Tips Scripts and Rehearsals Imagine there are two actors in a play. Both have important parts with a lot of dialogue. Actor #1 memorizes her lines before rehearsals begin. Actor #2 does not. When it comes to being able to perform more naturally, which actor has the advantage? There have been times when I have personally felt I was wasting my time thinking through and rehearsing scripts with my office team. I also think it is more fun to  play a round of golf than hit buckets of balls at the driving range. Sadly serious golf requires serious practice. It’s no different with dentistry. Here is how I see performance and rehearsals when it comes to dental practices. Whenever patients are in the office or on the phone, I tell the team that we are in performance mode. When we are debriefing and training, we sometimes will practice through role playing. And role playing exercises always work better and are easier to train when the team works from a developed script. If, on the other hand, you find this material, too general or too easy, I guess my question back to you is why is this a problem? Even if the material is simple – not as complicated as reading research articles, for example – people and their variety of personalities definitely are not. The objective is to give you a few tools to improve the quality and outcomes of conversations. People who tend to blow this off also often have interpersonal blind spots. They...

An Interesting Dental Marketing Approach

In my travels around the city visiting dental offices I came across this one. You might think I’m going to be critical just for the fun of it, but that really is not my intent. Instead, I am intrigued by the marketing strategy and business model. After all, when someone creates the front of his business to communicate in the way this dentist has, I believe he is inviting reactions and responses. First, obviously, this is an attempt to attract patients and the dentist has an idea who it is he or she wants to attract. As to the dentist’s skills, the front of the building doesn’t tell us this. We might make a few assumptions, but whatever those assumptions are, are unproven. Neither gender nor ethnic background have anything to do with the skills of the dentist. I know this based on working with a wide variety of dentists throughout my career. And there is nothing wrong with choosing to work with low-income groups as a personal calling. However, public presentation with regards to signs, office location, external and internal lighting, color selection and the rest all have affects on potential customers/clients/patients. I am curious why he came to promote his practice in the way he has. He certainly is outside the norm, which can be good or bad depending… Of course the biggest attractant to the marketplace for this dentist is his practice’s title, “Mr. Dentist.” This might not be that provocative in other countries where dentists have the title mister and not doctor. Again, it is the level of training and licensure that are important when...

Dentist Attempts to Stifle Critical Comments

Here’s an interesting article about a dentist who had patients sign agreements not to put disparaging comments on social network websites. http://onforb.es/wboJQW It’s a clever idea that will likely cause more negative publicity than had the dentist simply tried to resolve the patient’s problem. Now it’s a freedom of speech issue. This is a hard thing to swallow for any of us, but we have to be settled with the idea that some people will not like us. Certainly we should do everything we can to resolve conflicts and negative publicity, but there is a point where we are best off to let it go and trust that people can sense when someone is being unfairly criticized. I am not advocating passivity when it comes to negative publicity but instead of trying to squelch negative comments, I think it is always best to promote honest feedback and then respond to it, good or bad. This shows people that you, the dentist, are engaged and take the feelings and ideas of others seriously....

How To Get Straight A’s in College

This isn’t a joke and I can help if you seriously want to get straight A’s. But here’s the deal. If you decide not to follow my advice, and you don’t get straight A’s you will not whine or complain. You will admit to yourself and others that you chose the grades you got. Deal? Most people think that the smarter people get the better grades. Not true. The disciplined people get the better grades. They are smarter planners and better at executing a plan persistently and patiently. Sure you will find people who appear to be exceptions to what I am describing. They will get no sleep, party in excess and pull down good grades. What you may not know is that eventually they will implode. You cannot be distracted by their behavior or apparent success. This has nothing to do with you. Also you cannot get sucked into the plight of the academically needy. You did not come to college to babysit. If you are going to help others, become a tutor, set your hours and get paid for it. If you don’t get straight A’s because you denied your own studies to help others, understand this was your decision and you cannot blame those you helped after the fact. Are we clear? 1. To get straight A’s you must start work on the first day of school. If you slack even in the first week you can easily find yourself in catch up mode and your chances of Straight A’s are now uncertain. If you have to set up your dorm room or do any other...

Orthodontics and Periodontal Disease

Does having periodontal disease mean I can’t or shouldn’t have braces to straighten my teeth? Periodontal disease, when active, results in bone loss around teeth. Orthodontics involves moving teeth through bone to relocate them in better places for both appearance and function. The process of moving teeth activates bone cells to remove bone in front of the moving tooth and lay new bone down behind it. All of this occurs due to the light forces being applied by either wires or appliances patients must wear over the months necessary to accomplish the task. What is not helpful, as active orthodontics is taking place, is to have a bacterial infection and inflammatory response going on at the same time. This does not mean, however, that people who have had periodontal disease treated and controlled cannot undergo orthodontic procedures. In fact, sometimes this is desirable because it moves teeth to positions that are more easily cleaned. So let’s discuss how someone might proceed through orthodontics who has or has had periodontal disease. Make sure the periodontal disease is under control. Do not start orthodontics until released by the dentist involved with treating this condition. Understand the risk to each tooth before starting orthodontics as well. If a tooth has a poor or questionable prognosis (outlook for future retention and stability), it may be best to remove the tooth before starting treatment. Commit to on-going periodontal supportive care at a tighter interval to assure that periodontal disease does not recur. Usually following active periodontal therapy involving surgical procedures it is wise to be on a three-month supportive care interval for the first...